WEEK 93: (18th – 24th August 1919)

“We got home by about 9.30, rather cold by that time, Brighid & I went to tea to the Murphy’s & sat discussing people & politics round the table till after 11. Mrs M. upheld De Valera & Griffith as statesmen, & I exalted Mrs SD above them, & complained of caucassing, which they seemed to consider necessary in anythin plans that must be kept secret. Mrs Murphy abused women as being unable to keep from letting things out, & Dr M. thought men were worse – they do it for money.”

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WEEK 92: (11th – 17th August 1919)

“It was a lovely warm evening, & a lovely place, & lovely roads all round. Harry took me for a walk a.t., into Golden Grove by the back way past the turnip fields, & talked about the religion, beginning “Freddy tells me that Dorothea is inclined to be a Buddhist.” He despises Buddhism because he never heard of eminent Buddhists & he gave me an interesting account of the day of judgement & the answers Jehovah will make to critics. He has the most personal, human idea of him of any one I ever heard talk outside a Catholic church. He admitted the apparent truth of some things I said.”

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WEEK 91: (4th – 10th August 1919)

“This was the day Mrs Sheehy-Skeffington got knocked on the head by a policeman with the butt of a rifle […] because she wd not refrain from speaking at their order. She got concussion of the brain & septic poisoning afterwards, & was very ill. The word policeman was not allowed to be mentioned in any Irish paper describing the occurrence, so their descriptions were practically non-existent. We all worked hard from breakfast till 11, which was not so long as it looks on paper, & then held meeting in the dining room for an hour in perfect silence”

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WEEK 89: (21st – 27th July 1919)

“Hanbury was civil & quiet & didn’t say much. When we were going home he asked me was I was Socialist & when I said I didn’t know what I was since reading Three Roads to Freedom he said wasn’t it a splendid book. Paine came up thro’ Mr W. saying he had read his Rights of Man but couldn’t see what basis there was to the idea of national right unless it is allowed to come from God. Katie as usual took little part.”

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WEEK 88: (14th – 20th July 1918)

“There were a few flags out along Lower Newtown, but when we went up Newtown Rd among all the Unionist houses we only saw one all the way. D. and Tony & Louis & I went out as far as Power’s Nursery hill & sat on the wall there & saw thousands of motors & other vehicles go by picnickers I suppose. It was a fine warm day but cloudy. Tony is a model at rolling the pram. We spent the afternoon picking fruit & weeding, & got a short game of casino after tea. I moved to Suirview in the motor as it was taking Tony to the station.”

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WEEK 87: (7th – 13th July 1919)

“Lovely hot day. Dorothea & Louis & Tony went to Cork by the 19.50 train, the former to stay at Redclyffe. Stephen & Ben were both coming down the following Saturday. There was a committee a.t., and O’Mahony the organiser was there in a rather disagreeable & bumptious mood, rebuking us for not having 3 times the membership & being very unhelpful towards solving the problem of how Brazil is to do his duty to the county and at the same time give his whole time to registration work, which seems to be urgently necessary, Brazil doesn’t know what to do, & apparently works 7 days a week.”

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WEEK 86: (30th June – 6th July 1919)

“I had to go to the feis immediately after dinner. Of course it was an hour or so late starting, & Miss Doyle, Mrs Daly etc, were running a tea room & were thus provided with a reason for not going to the platform. I attacked them about it afterwards, but of course they had good excuses. Liam de Roiste spoke, mostly in Irish, & very well,but he’s a remarkably plain man. Mr Butler & I went to the history at once, & I took the juniors (1782 – 1850) about 8 or 9, & he the middle ones (Young Ireland Movement). I heard him ask one what impression the movement had left on her mind. I went off as quick as I could because the motor was waiting for me outside, & found them trying to see over the wall.”

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WEEK 85: (23rd – 29th June 1919)

“I spent the afternoon & evening at the exhibition except when I was having tea with Miss Cutlar at St. Declan’s. They had it in an arbour in the garden, & talked about the war etc. Her mother was there. The exhibition was poor as regards art & the arrangement of flowers (all colours together) but there were lovely white embroidery & some of the pen painting & stenciling was pretty, & my things looked very nice, & the cookery was of course sublime.”

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WEEK 84: (16th – 22th June 1919)

“D. [Dorothea] told me a lot of things about George Goldfoot’s dentistry & the Aunt Lottie’s objection to let her go to a dentist alone. It seems G.G. never gives anyone gas, & when she asked his assistant once when she was getting a tooth out, wasn’t he going to put anything on it, he said with an air of great surprise “Oh, you want a painless extraction?”

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