WEEK 101: (13th – 19th October 1919)

“I went down with Hanna to Harcourt St to see what was going to be done about the Árd Feís that was proclaimed that morning. There was the usual male crowd there, increasingly rapidly as delegates arrived. It came out that Griffith, Mick Collins, & Milroy & a few other prominent men had held a midnight meeting in a hotel, with blocks of delegates from other hotels, which they called an Árd Feís, & decided to keep on all present officers & have no compromise with the Party in future Ulster elections. There wasn’t a single woman at it, & several male members of the executive also were not notified.”

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WEEK 100: (6th – 12th October 1919)

“I went to meet Ben at the Vegetarian at 1, & found Tony standing at the door reading Wolfe Tone. Nancy & Bob were also of the party. We found Ben knew where more of the places Tone mentions were, so after dinner we all went to inspect the inside of the City Hall. It’s a splendid marble palace, nearly as beautiful as South Kensington museum, but has the trail of Edward & Alexandra all over it, and all the portraits of course are the usual dull pompous style. “

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WEEK 99: (29th – 5th October 1919)

“Bessie & I took the baby to Lafayette’s in Royal Avenue to be photographed, and had a dreadful time. First we were kept waiting, & then as soon as we got into the room she commenced to bawl, & kept on for nearly ¼ of an hour, screaming and wringing her hands in spite of all the photographer & we could do with toys which he produced. Finally he did get 3 photos. Of course Bessie thought it was all his fault for not producing the toys quick enough; I thought if I was a photographer I would charge extra for babies.”

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WEEK 98: (22nd – 28th September 1919)

“He & Bessie had a discussion about conversion & original sin, which he doesn’t believe in, though he seems very religious, & he treated her exactly as an equal, which very few middle aged men would do, offering to her almost with diffidence, Aubrey was kind of neutral. He & E.G. & I went to a sort of little informal evening meeting at a Friend’s house in the neighbourhood then, & the conversion argument was continued most of the way. When A. & I came back we found Mrs Harding & her little Mrs Glynn was there, & walked home with me, talking of the suppression of the Sinn Fein papers.”

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WEEK 97: (15th – 21st September 1919)

“Nina had a row with her maid, who is a sour, disagreeable middle aged woman with asthma, not much use. It upset Nina very much & I had to do a lot of sympathizing, which I am not specially good at – I shd try to be better. We spent the afternoon at Annegrove, which is unchanged except that the see saw is gone & Carry is there instead of Susabel. The latter is rather an improvement. Ada Pim is as nice as ever, & there was a black pug called Dingo, & 4 lovely little black retriever puppies.”

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WEEK 96: (8th – 14th September 1919)

“Miss Bowman’s haunted house was at Braybrooke, near Market Harborough, north heights. It was belonging to the Board School, & every schoolmistress lived in it rent free. The first noises were like slates & books thrown against wall & falling in pieces on table, then people were heard walking about especially in kitchen – in broad daylight, in the room where she sat. Others heard it with her.”

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WEEK 95: (1st – 7th September 1919)

“There was a S.P.C.A. committee in the afternoon. Uncle E. & Mr Robinson are both resigning. I think Sir James Power wd make a good president. Tom etc went to Woodstown in the motor in the evening, to clear up after the Bannans, and took Aunt Isabella. I went over to St Declan’s after tea to stay a while. They came back at 8, in time for D. to put Louis to bed. That evening there was a lot of talk & facetious reminiscences about flirting & falling in love; I don’t know why sex attraction should always be trusted as a comic subject of the “nuff said” & then laugh sort, nor why Tony should talk as if he was the greatest flirt in the world when he is nothing of the sort.”

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WEEK 94: (25th – 31st August 1919)

“Very wet morning. B. showed me nice photos of her brother Mike & his family. How superior he looks to the 2 English brothers in law. She was telling me about the farce she wrote about Cats when she was at the Ursuline, it sounded very good in parts. It cleared in the afternoon & she took one over the castle which was rather interesting, but the only thing of any importance known about it seems to be that it belonged to the Ormonds & Black Thomas Butler lived there. Then we visited a china shop kept by a Mrs Hinkson whom B. knows in Cumann na mBan, & I bought 2 nice plates for 6′”

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WEEK 93: (18th – 24th August 1919)

“We got home by about 9.30, rather cold by that time, Brighid & I went to tea to the Murphy’s & sat discussing people & politics round the table till after 11. Mrs M. upheld De Valera & Griffith as statesmen, & I exalted Mrs SD above them, & complained of caucassing, which they seemed to consider necessary in anythin plans that must be kept secret. Mrs Murphy abused women as being unable to keep from letting things out, & Dr M. thought men were worse – they do it for money.”

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WEEK 92: (11th – 17th August 1919)

“It was a lovely warm evening, & a lovely place, & lovely roads all round. Harry took me for a walk a.t., into Golden Grove by the back way past the turnip fields, & talked about the religion, beginning “Freddy tells me that Dorothea is inclined to be a Buddhist.” He despises Buddhism because he never heard of eminent Buddhists & he gave me an interesting account of the day of judgement & the answers Jehovah will make to critics. He has the most personal, human idea of him of any one I ever heard talk outside a Catholic church. He admitted the apparent truth of some things I said.”

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