WEEK 93: (18th – 24th August 1919)

“We got home by about 9.30, rather cold by that time, Brighid & I went to tea to the Murphy’s & sat discussing people & politics round the table till after 11. Mrs M. upheld De Valera & Griffith as statesmen, & I exalted Mrs SD above them, & complained of caucassing, which they seemed to consider necessary in anythin plans that must be kept secret. Mrs Murphy abused women as being unable to keep from letting things out, & Dr M. thought men were worse – they do it for money.”

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WEEK 74: (7th – 13th April 1919)

“I went to Dr Lynn’s & visited her & Madeline at breakfast, & they told me the true inwardness of the De V. reception fiasco. It seems it was all arranged by a few of the I.R.B. inner ring in the executive, & Ald. Kelly even knew nothing of it till he saw the arrangements with his own name underneath published as officially ordered. So now the movement is saddled with the obloquy of the failure. They seemed to think it wd be brought up at the Ard Fheis but they were very mistaken. I had just got a seat in the round room when MacDonagh came beside & talked to me, & he got on the same subject & said the headquarters are going to blazes with caballing & intrique.”

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WEEK 25: (18th – 23rd March 1918)

width=“Dorothea had a visit from a girl named Minnie Doyle who was looking for Edward Jacob – she had a baby in New Ross workhouse when she was 16, through absolutely no fault of her own, & being left all alone at the time for hours after, the baby died & she was tried for murdering it, but acquitted, whereupon she was put into the Good Sheppard convent here, & very badly treated there according to her account. Edward Jacob had visited her in prison, & told her to apply to him when she came out, but when she asked the nuns for the wherewithal to write to him, they wdn’t give it.”

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WEEK 14: (31st Dec 1917 – Jan 6th 1918)

“I went down to the essay meeting, picking up T at the office. It was a good plain tea, but the essay – “Friends & Slavery” by Isabel Grubb, was not so interesting as it should have been. She gave a short survey of slavery from early times, with frightful statistics of the huge share England took in it – 38,000 shipped from Africa by English ships in one year of the 1790’s- . & 36,000 by ships of all other nations. She spoke of the civil war in America as a war against slavery, & Tom and Miss Walpole set her right about that in the discussion.”

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WEEK 11: (10th – 16th December 1917)

They gave me some instructions about the stalls, Women Delegates’ vegetable stall & the shirts etc. Mrs Ginnell was in the W.D. stall first next door to the shirts – & then Miss Barton, whom I like better. There was a big dolls’ house on the counter, made & furnished by Grace Plunkett, & this was a great attraction; every day I was there my principal work was opening the front of it for people to look in.”

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WEEK 3: (15th – 21st October 1917)

I went to the S. F. committee in the evening, and they went over all the branch resolutions in the Convention agenda & instructed us to vote for or against each, or as we liked. There was only one that we were told to vote against; adherence to the policy as expounded by A. G. Séan Matthews was very determined against that, thinking it repudiated the use of arms altogether”.

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