WEEK 102: (20th-26th October 1919)

“Dr Lynn came in the morning to ask one to go with her & Edith Ellis, the English pacifist who was staying at the Standard, & who gave £100 to the Babies Hospital, to the Mater Hospital to see the released hunger strikers there. E.E. wanted to visit them, & the Dr was pressed for time & wanted me to stay with her & take charge of her. Dr L. had a couple of visits to pay first, then we picked up E.E. at the Standard, a rather goodlooking woman but with very round eyes, & went on to the hospital. “

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WEEK 100: (6th – 12th October 1919)

“I went to meet Ben at the Vegetarian at 1, & found Tony standing at the door reading Wolfe Tone. Nancy & Bob were also of the party. We found Ben knew where more of the places Tone mentions were, so after dinner we all went to inspect the inside of the City Hall. It’s a splendid marble palace, nearly as beautiful as South Kensington museum, but has the trail of Edward & Alexandra all over it, and all the portraits of course are the usual dull pompous style. “

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WEEK 25: (18th – 23rd March 1918)

width=“Dorothea had a visit from a girl named Minnie Doyle who was looking for Edward Jacob – she had a baby in New Ross workhouse when she was 16, through absolutely no fault of her own, & being left all alone at the time for hours after, the baby died & she was tried for murdering it, but acquitted, whereupon she was put into the Good Sheppard convent here, & very badly treated there according to her account. Edward Jacob had visited her in prison, & told her to apply to him when she came out, but when she asked the nuns for the wherewithal to write to him, they wdn’t give it.”

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WEEK 24: (11th – 17th March 1918)

width=“The Redmonites had a procession in the evening & I, not being sure at first that they were Redmonites, hung a flag out of the drawing room window, which infuriated them so that a lot of them came and hurled themselves against the door, & yelled & shouted, and put up a torch to burn the flag, I pulled it in just in time & they threw a torch in after it, but it went out as soon as it fell.”

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