WEEK 119: (23rd – 29th February 1920

“She[ Mrs Power]  told me most of the shootings of policemen are done by robber-gangs of demobilised soldiers, or by policemen with personal grudges. They had a horrid experience there a few days before; a baby dying there from exposure on a journey & subsequent want of care. Louis got quite friendly with Marie, chasing her round the table. I’m sure she would be splendid at minding small children.”

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WEEK 118: (18th – 22nd February 1920)

“I finished typing Callaghan this Thursday. Tom and Dorothea say it is good in the main, & that the relations of Callaghan & Frances to each other are good, but they object strongly to the ghost, and pick out all sorts of things, like the mention of certain superstitions & of the stones in Frances’s ring, which they think will be considered silly & which may go against it with Maxwell I shouldn’t have thought a publisher would bother to object to such things.”

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WEEK 116: (1st – 8th February 1920)

Barronstrand Street Co Waterford 1907 - National Library of Ireland Ref Number P_WP_1732

“I went over to St Declan’s after tea, as Seán was there, and he had most interesting conversation about how much worse managers & bishops are at squashing the language in national schools than the National Board, re the new education bill, which wd put the schools in the hands of committees instead of under the clergy alone, & which is being litterly [sic] opposed by them for that reason”

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WEEK 115: (20th – 29th January 1920)

“I finished a ring with the moonstone that I gave Eileen Power in a pendant in 1918, & which she wanted in a ring instead. I took it to them in the afternoon and E. was very pleased with it. They were interested in Tom being on the Corporation & told me the mean conduct of P. W. Kenny in persuading Mr Power to stand (Leave it all to me – I’ll put you in) & then doing nothing whatever, so that Mr P. was beaten. It was disgraceful. I went to Willie Jacob’s essay meeting – some Dickens Character & their Originals.”

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WEEK 111: (22nd – 28th December 1919)

“Fine cold day. Aunt H. gave me a new umbrella & some chocolate. W. Waring sent me a little round photo frame, but the glass arrived cracked, J. Webb sent me a queer little tiny pen in a case, Aunt Maggie some lovely handkerchiefs, Aunt Bessie a handkerchief, Helen a cobwebly little handkerchief case. T. & D. a fine big muffler of the sort that’s going now, & Nancy a very grand Browning calendar. I have Aunt H. The Ship that Sailed too Soon & a photoframe, & Uncle E. green grapes. Ben sent me Darrell Figgis’s Byeways of Study, & I read most of it that morning. The articles on Parnell & H. O’Neill’s terms were very interesting. “

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WEEK 99: (29th – 5th October 1919)

“Bessie & I took the baby to Lafayette’s in Royal Avenue to be photographed, and had a dreadful time. First we were kept waiting, & then as soon as we got into the room she commenced to bawl, & kept on for nearly ¼ of an hour, screaming and wringing her hands in spite of all the photographer & we could do with toys which he produced. Finally he did get 3 photos. Of course Bessie thought it was all his fault for not producing the toys quick enough; I thought if I was a photographer I would charge extra for babies.”

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WEEK 94: (25th – 31st August 1919)

“Very wet morning. B. showed me nice photos of her brother Mike & his family. How superior he looks to the 2 English brothers in law. She was telling me about the farce she wrote about Cats when she was at the Ursuline, it sounded very good in parts. It cleared in the afternoon & she took one over the castle which was rather interesting, but the only thing of any importance known about it seems to be that it belonged to the Ormonds & Black Thomas Butler lived there. Then we visited a china shop kept by a Mrs Hinkson whom B. knows in Cumann na mBan, & I bought 2 nice plates for 6′”

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