WEEK 105: (10th – 16th November 1919)

“I went to the Stephens’s & she to the Franchise League. Ned & Lily were alone, with a book on dreams that looked very interesting; by some German professor. Ned said it held that all dreams were products of the subconscious self & showed what it wanted & was like when scientifically examined – & that most dreams are connected with sex – inhibited sex desires chiefly. Comparatively few of mine are, as far as I can see.”

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WEEK 82: (2nd – 8th June 1919)

“In the afternoon we went in to town in the motor and visited at Suirview and went to the theatre to see “David Garrick” by a company belonging to a man named Macready who gives the impression of thinking a lot of himself, and seems much admired. The play was no good; the only pleasant things in it were some parts of the drunken scene, though as a whole that was deplorable (“me murdered love!”) and the beautiful legs of one of the lowbred commercial guests, who otherwise was supremely hideous. Garrick might have made himself fairly goodlooking, but so much depends on dress & hair in those 18th century plays…”

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WEEK 79: (12th – 16th May 1919)

“Then I went to the club committee & found a row going on, J. Wylie had said in a speech on Labour day that the less some people said about what they had done for Ireland the better, & Brazil took this to himself & was raging, & wanted J. W. to withdraw it, & so did everyone else except Ald. Power, who never encourages people to be offended, J. Wylie & myself. J. W. had already said he didn’t mean Brazil, but that wdn’t satisfy them. They prating how a withdrawal was the only way to restore harmony, whereas it seemed to me a forced withdrawal was the best way to increase & perpetuate ill feeling.”

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WEEK 76: (21st – 27th April 1919)

“I went to the Metropole then & had a long interview with Tash, during most of which she was blasting men in her best manner. It was a propos of the alleged shocking state of the streets at night, & the suggested women’s patrols & the bishop talking of course as if the girls did all the scandal themselves. Tash spoke very plainly of the bishop, & her remedy for the state of the streets wd be for the older women to catch a solider & tar & feather him & drive him down the quay […] She said a man from Limerick boasted to Seán Lane how some young men there – Volunteers I think – caught 6 girls that had been walking with soldiers and cut their hair off for a punishment, and I don’t think I ever so anyone so possessed with rage about anything as she was about this. She seems to have crushed Seán Lane into powder when he told her of it in an approving way…”

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