WEEK 111: (22nd – 28th December 1919)

“Fine cold day. Aunt H. gave me a new umbrella & some chocolate. W. Waring sent me a little round photo frame, but the glass arrived cracked, J. Webb sent me a queer little tiny pen in a case, Aunt Maggie some lovely handkerchiefs, Aunt Bessie a handkerchief, Helen a cobwebly little handkerchief case. T. & D. a fine big muffler of the sort that’s going now, & Nancy a very grand Browning calendar. I have Aunt H. The Ship that Sailed too Soon & a photoframe, & Uncle E. green grapes. Ben sent me Darrell Figgis’s Byeways of Study, & I read most of it that morning. The articles on Parnell & H. O’Neill’s terms were very interesting. “

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WEEK 76: (21st – 27th April 1919)

“I went to the Metropole then & had a long interview with Tash, during most of which she was blasting men in her best manner. It was a propos of the alleged shocking state of the streets at night, & the suggested women’s patrols & the bishop talking of course as if the girls did all the scandal themselves. Tash spoke very plainly of the bishop, & her remedy for the state of the streets wd be for the older women to catch a solider & tar & feather him & drive him down the quay […] She said a man from Limerick boasted to Seán Lane how some young men there – Volunteers I think – caught 6 girls that had been walking with soldiers and cut their hair off for a punishment, and I don’t think I ever so anyone so possessed with rage about anything as she was about this. She seems to have crushed Seán Lane into powder when he told her of it in an approving way…”

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WEEK 57: (28th Oct – 3rd November 1918)

“Fr O’Flanagan pointed out that if you must vote for the Republican candidate whatever his minor sins; even if he disagrees with you in religion or social questions, he is the lesser of 2 evils. At 1…we formed up in the front garden of the Mansion house & marched round Grafton St into College Green & gathered under Grattan’s statue. I was between Mrs S S and Countess Plunkett, & Mrs Pearse was somewhere near. Fr O’F. was the only speaker, he had a good powerful voice for open air speaking. Three peelers tried to get through at one point, but we shoved them back and they retired.”

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