WEEK 119: (23rd – 29th February 1920

“She[ Mrs Power]  told me most of the shootings of policemen are done by robber-gangs of demobilised soldiers, or by policemen with personal grudges. They had a horrid experience there a few days before; a baby dying there from exposure on a journey & subsequent want of care. Louis got quite friendly with Marie, chasing her round the table. I’m sure she would be splendid at minding small children.”

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WEEK 116: (1st – 8th February 1920)

Barronstrand Street Co Waterford 1907 - National Library of Ireland Ref Number P_WP_1732

“I went over to St Declan’s after tea, as Seán was there, and he had most interesting conversation about how much worse managers & bishops are at squashing the language in national schools than the National Board, re the new education bill, which wd put the schools in the hands of committees instead of under the clergy alone, & which is being litterly [sic] opposed by them for that reason”

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WEEK 115: (20th – 29th January 1920)

“I finished a ring with the moonstone that I gave Eileen Power in a pendant in 1918, & which she wanted in a ring instead. I took it to them in the afternoon and E. was very pleased with it. They were interested in Tom being on the Corporation & told me the mean conduct of P. W. Kenny in persuading Mr Power to stand (Leave it all to me – I’ll put you in) & then doing nothing whatever, so that Mr P. was beaten. It was disgraceful. I went to Willie Jacob’s essay meeting – some Dickens Character & their Originals.”

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WEEK 106: (17th – 23rd November 1919)

“Aunt H. and I tried to work a Ouija set that she had made, & it did not work well when we tried together but did better separately. It went very well for me, purporting to represent Papa & saying one or two things that were very like them. Later on I tried writing with a pencil which I had never been able to do, & after 10 minutes or so it began to move, & presently wrote – very badly, & rather nonsensically under the name of Wolfe Tone.”

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WEEK 86: (30th June – 6th July 1919)

“I had to go to the feis immediately after dinner. Of course it was an hour or so late starting, & Miss Doyle, Mrs Daly etc, were running a tea room & were thus provided with a reason for not going to the platform. I attacked them about it afterwards, but of course they had good excuses. Liam de Roiste spoke, mostly in Irish, & very well,but he’s a remarkably plain man. Mr Butler & I went to the history at once, & I took the juniors (1782 – 1850) about 8 or 9, & he the middle ones (Young Ireland Movement). I heard him ask one what impression the movement had left on her mind. I went off as quick as I could because the motor was waiting for me outside, & found them trying to see over the wall.”

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WEEK 83: (9th – 15th June 1919)

“After tea I went to a C. na mb. meeting & was overjoyed to find they had written to Át Cliat asking to be let off from the flag day because they thought it would inflame the Redmonites & cause violence & injure our chances at the next election, & anyhow only 6 were willing to sell. They seemed poor reasons to me, & unlikely, except the last, but I was just as glad. They had got no reply yet, so there was to be another meeting the next evening.”

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WEEK 82: (2nd – 8th June 1919)

“In the afternoon we went in to town in the motor and visited at Suirview and went to the theatre to see “David Garrick” by a company belonging to a man named Macready who gives the impression of thinking a lot of himself, and seems much admired. The play was no good; the only pleasant things in it were some parts of the drunken scene, though as a whole that was deplorable (“me murdered love!”) and the beautiful legs of one of the lowbred commercial guests, who otherwise was supremely hideous. Garrick might have made himself fairly goodlooking, but so much depends on dress & hair in those 18th century plays…”

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WEEK 76: (21st – 27th April 1919)

“I went to the Metropole then & had a long interview with Tash, during most of which she was blasting men in her best manner. It was a propos of the alleged shocking state of the streets at night, & the suggested women’s patrols & the bishop talking of course as if the girls did all the scandal themselves. Tash spoke very plainly of the bishop, & her remedy for the state of the streets wd be for the older women to catch a solider & tar & feather him & drive him down the quay […] She said a man from Limerick boasted to Seán Lane how some young men there – Volunteers I think – caught 6 girls that had been walking with soldiers and cut their hair off for a punishment, and I don’t think I ever so anyone so possessed with rage about anything as she was about this. She seems to have crushed Seán Lane into powder when he told her of it in an approving way…”

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