WEEK 86: (30th June – 6th July 1919)

“I had to go to the feis immediately after dinner. Of course it was an hour or so late starting, & Miss Doyle, Mrs Daly etc, were running a tea room & were thus provided with a reason for not going to the platform. I attacked them about it afterwards, but of course they had good excuses. Liam de Roiste spoke, mostly in Irish, & very well,but he’s a remarkably plain man. Mr Butler & I went to the history at once, & I took the juniors (1782 – 1850) about 8 or 9, & he the middle ones (Young Ireland Movement). I heard him ask one what impression the movement had left on her mind. I went off as quick as I could because the motor was waiting for me outside, & found them trying to see over the wall.”

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WEEK 83: (9th – 15th June 1919)

“After tea I went to a C. na mb. meeting & was overjoyed to find they had written to Át Cliat asking to be let off from the flag day because they thought it would inflame the Redmonites & cause violence & injure our chances at the next election, & anyhow only 6 were willing to sell. They seemed poor reasons to me, & unlikely, except the last, but I was just as glad. They had got no reply yet, so there was to be another meeting the next evening.”

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WEEK 82: (2nd – 8th June 1919)

“In the afternoon we went in to town in the motor and visited at Suirview and went to the theatre to see “David Garrick” by a company belonging to a man named Macready who gives the impression of thinking a lot of himself, and seems much admired. The play was no good; the only pleasant things in it were some parts of the drunken scene, though as a whole that was deplorable (“me murdered love!”) and the beautiful legs of one of the lowbred commercial guests, who otherwise was supremely hideous. Garrick might have made himself fairly goodlooking, but so much depends on dress & hair in those 18th century plays…”

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WEEK 76: (21st – 27th April 1919)

“I went to the Metropole then & had a long interview with Tash, during most of which she was blasting men in her best manner. It was a propos of the alleged shocking state of the streets at night, & the suggested women’s patrols & the bishop talking of course as if the girls did all the scandal themselves. Tash spoke very plainly of the bishop, & her remedy for the state of the streets wd be for the older women to catch a solider & tar & feather him & drive him down the quay […] She said a man from Limerick boasted to Seán Lane how some young men there – Volunteers I think – caught 6 girls that had been walking with soldiers and cut their hair off for a punishment, and I don’t think I ever so anyone so possessed with rage about anything as she was about this. She seems to have crushed Seán Lane into powder when he told her of it in an approving way…”

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WEEK 75: (14th – 20th April 1919)

“I went to the Tech & finished the carbuncle pendant, which was much admired. Dorothea came over a.d. to look at furniture for the Saratoga. I wish they wd change the name of it, but they won’t. Tom & I were raking out the garret later, & found the story of Edward, which had been lost for years. Mrs Hayden came to see me […] & we discussed the Bible & the 10 Commandments. She affirmed that there was no difference between them & Christ’s teaching, & that “Thou shalt love the Lord thy God…& thy neighbours as thyself” was one of them, till I showed them to her. She objects greatly to nuns.”

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WEEK 20: (11th – 17th February 1918)

“In the afternoon I went to the Powers, to go on plebiscite work to some monastic institutions. We went first to the de la sale college & saw Br. Ignatius, a big red fat man, not very polite & entirely opposed to us, taking refuge behind politics & the governmental nature of the place, of course. They asked if the students could sign outside, which he could not deny. The Powers of course disliked him even more than I did.”

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WEEK 18: (28th Jan – 3rd February 1918)

“The officers’ class was all about a rifle. Paddy – , the bold officer, had one drawn, & all its pasts named, but he didn’t show the inside of it. I learned that an oak is the best tree to shelter from bullets behind, being hardest for them to get through, & how a cartridge is made – he had a cartridge which he took to pieces for us, & showed us the cap & the little holes the spark comes through to the powder…. Paddy – says that in an execution squad only one rifle is loaded, which seems to me a ridiculous arrangement.”

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WEEK 15: (7th – 13th January 1918)

“I spoke of studying the policy, but M.N. said it was no use on Thursday evenings because of the dancing at the League, & the others did not contradict her. Then she began talking of the ceilidh, which she wasn’t at, & cursing the system of men only having the right to ask for a partner. She means to suggest at the Volunteer hall that at their dances men & women should ask each other alternately, dance about, & the other girls said they would back her up, but I don’t believe they will.”

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WEEK 13: (24th – 30th December 1917)

“We were talking of Uncle Tom’s Cabin which Kitty had never read, & I got it from Suirview to show her the pictures which appeared to interest her. She has a blessed power of being interested in things that you tell her, & in people especially. The more I read that book the more I am impressed by its merits & the more I like St Clare. Its only now that I am beginning to appreciate Uncle Tom himself.”

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