WEEK 128: (26th April – 2nd May)

“After tea I had to go & visit Joe & Doreen over the shop in Prince’s St & they took me to the pictures. There was a good comic film about an elixir of youth that made you old if you took too much, but the girls in it had beastly stage dresses, both ugly & indecent, & there was a war story about a French girl who was captured by a handsome German prince & was his adored mistress for a long time…”

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WEEK 127:(21st – 25th April 1920)

“I went to the Tech & worked at the Brooch of mine that Aunt H. gave Brenda, which needs a good deal of repair. In the evening B. and I went to the Coliseum, and saw a very funny sheriff’s-daughter story about fool & robbers, & a piece of a serial about a circus man whom a gang of scoundrels were trying to kill – he was good-looking – and a tiresome thing about Charlie Chaplin as a pawnbroker’s assistant – & a whole story called “Words & Music by” which was far the best of the evening. “

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WEEK 114: (12th – 18th January 1920)

“I had been reading Psychoanalysis, on loan from Dorothea – a very interesting and suggestive book, which makes me want to read Freud and others. What a lot of apology she has to make for the large part that sex is supposed to play in the unconscious mind – as if most people must be taken for granted as hating & resenting the existence of sexuality in themselves. And yet those people would like things that would revolt me. Dorothea had got able to write automatically by this time, and got a message from Mr Black for his wife.”

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WEEK 113: (5th – 11th January 1920)

I went to St. Declan’s a.d. to mind Louis while Dorothea went canvassing with Mrs Hayden. He was out with Miss Nesbitt, but came in soon, and was very cross and miserable for a long time. I told D. of the communications I had had from her mother mostly about her children & their likeness to her, which she said were quite true – that she was like her in eyes & mind, & suffered for want of an interest in his life & that Tony was very little changed since she left them. D. had been trying to write, but could not, so I brought her the Ouija board.”

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WEEK 105: (10th – 16th November 1919)

“I went to the Stephens’s & she to the Franchise League. Ned & Lily were alone, with a book on dreams that looked very interesting; by some German professor. Ned said it held that all dreams were products of the subconscious self & showed what it wanted & was like when scientifically examined – & that most dreams are connected with sex – inhibited sex desires chiefly. Comparatively few of mine are, as far as I can see.”

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WEEK 99: (29th – 5th October 1919)

“Bessie & I took the baby to Lafayette’s in Royal Avenue to be photographed, and had a dreadful time. First we were kept waiting, & then as soon as we got into the room she commenced to bawl, & kept on for nearly ¼ of an hour, screaming and wringing her hands in spite of all the photographer & we could do with toys which he produced. Finally he did get 3 photos. Of course Bessie thought it was all his fault for not producing the toys quick enough; I thought if I was a photographer I would charge extra for babies.”

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WEEK 96: (8th – 14th September 1919)

“Miss Bowman’s haunted house was at Braybrooke, near Market Harborough, north heights. It was belonging to the Board School, & every schoolmistress lived in it rent free. The first noises were like slates & books thrown against wall & falling in pieces on table, then people were heard walking about especially in kitchen – in broad daylight, in the room where she sat. Others heard it with her.”

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WEEK 95: (1st – 7th September 1919)

“There was a S.P.C.A. committee in the afternoon. Uncle E. & Mr Robinson are both resigning. I think Sir James Power wd make a good president. Tom etc went to Woodstown in the motor in the evening, to clear up after the Bannans, and took Aunt Isabella. I went over to St Declan’s after tea to stay a while. They came back at 8, in time for D. to put Louis to bed. That evening there was a lot of talk & facetious reminiscences about flirting & falling in love; I don’t know why sex attraction should always be trusted as a comic subject of the “nuff said” & then laugh sort, nor why Tony should talk as if he was the greatest flirt in the world when he is nothing of the sort.”

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