WEEK 105: (10th – 16th November 1919)

“I went to the Stephens’s & she to the Franchise League. Ned & Lily were alone, with a book on dreams that looked very interesting; by some German professor. Ned said it held that all dreams were products of the subconscious self & showed what it wanted & was like when scientifically examined – & that most dreams are connected with sex – inhibited sex desires chiefly. Comparatively few of mine are, as far as I can see.”

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WEEK 104: (3rd – 9th November 1919)

“I know Hanna used to talk interestingly while I was eating my breakfast these mornings but I can’t remember it unless it was about the American beauty parlours & the money they spend on it etc. It rained this day & i went to the Pelman place in Dawson St in the afternoon & got their 1st book & visited Lasairfhiona in her new office in Molesworth St, & then went to see the Stephenses again. “

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WEEK 103: (27th – 2nd November 1919)

“I went into Dublin in the evening to the I.W.F.L. to read Shaw’s views on parents & children for them to discuss. There was a good attendance, but of course they did not discuss the things I wanted them to, but went off on education, which I had carefully left out. Mr Bridgeman ascribed to Shaw extraordinary aims about taking all children away from their parents & bringing them up in institutions. “

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WEEK 102: (20th-26th October 1919)

“Dr Lynn came in the morning to ask one to go with her & Edith Ellis, the English pacifist who was staying at the Standard, & who gave £100 to the Babies Hospital, to the Mater Hospital to see the released hunger strikers there. E.E. wanted to visit them, & the Dr was pressed for time & wanted me to stay with her & take charge of her. Dr L. had a couple of visits to pay first, then we picked up E.E. at the Standard, a rather goodlooking woman but with very round eyes, & went on to the hospital. “

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WEEK 101: (13th – 19th October 1919)

“I went down with Hanna to Harcourt St to see what was going to be done about the Árd Feís that was proclaimed that morning. There was the usual male crowd there, increasingly rapidly as delegates arrived. It came out that Griffith, Mick Collins, & Milroy & a few other prominent men had held a midnight meeting in a hotel, with blocks of delegates from other hotels, which they called an Árd Feís, & decided to keep on all present officers & have no compromise with the Party in future Ulster elections. There wasn’t a single woman at it, & several male members of the executive also were not notified.”

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WEEK 100: (6th – 12th October 1919)

“I went to meet Ben at the Vegetarian at 1, & found Tony standing at the door reading Wolfe Tone. Nancy & Bob were also of the party. We found Ben knew where more of the places Tone mentions were, so after dinner we all went to inspect the inside of the City Hall. It’s a splendid marble palace, nearly as beautiful as South Kensington museum, but has the trail of Edward & Alexandra all over it, and all the portraits of course are the usual dull pompous style. “

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WEEK 99: (29th – 5th October 1919)

“Bessie & I took the baby to Lafayette’s in Royal Avenue to be photographed, and had a dreadful time. First we were kept waiting, & then as soon as we got into the room she commenced to bawl, & kept on for nearly ¼ of an hour, screaming and wringing her hands in spite of all the photographer & we could do with toys which he produced. Finally he did get 3 photos. Of course Bessie thought it was all his fault for not producing the toys quick enough; I thought if I was a photographer I would charge extra for babies.”

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WEEK 98: (22nd – 28th September 1919)

“He & Bessie had a discussion about conversion & original sin, which he doesn’t believe in, though he seems very religious, & he treated her exactly as an equal, which very few middle aged men would do, offering to her almost with diffidence, Aubrey was kind of neutral. He & E.G. & I went to a sort of little informal evening meeting at a Friend’s house in the neighbourhood then, & the conversion argument was continued most of the way. When A. & I came back we found Mrs Harding & her little Mrs Glynn was there, & walked home with me, talking of the suppression of the Sinn Fein papers.”

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WEEK 97: (15th – 21st September 1919)

“Nina had a row with her maid, who is a sour, disagreeable middle aged woman with asthma, not much use. It upset Nina very much & I had to do a lot of sympathizing, which I am not specially good at – I shd try to be better. We spent the afternoon at Annegrove, which is unchanged except that the see saw is gone & Carry is there instead of Susabel. The latter is rather an improvement. Ada Pim is as nice as ever, & there was a black pug called Dingo, & 4 lovely little black retriever puppies.”

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WEEK 96: (8th – 14th September 1919)

“Miss Bowman’s haunted house was at Braybrooke, near Market Harborough, north heights. It was belonging to the Board School, & every schoolmistress lived in it rent free. The first noises were like slates & books thrown against wall & falling in pieces on table, then people were heard walking about especially in kitchen – in broad daylight, in the room where she sat. Others heard it with her.”

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